I have a website!

Call me Koryos. I study biology and psychology and I write novels. Right now my goals are to a) go to grad school and b) get published.

My blog is like 85% animal science and 15% video games with a smattering of kvetchy text posts so I hope you're ok with that. And I also like... write fiction... occasionally.

I KNOW I WROTE THAT CAT POST BUT I CAN'T DIAGNOSE YOUR CAT'S BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS PLEASE TALK TO A VET I AM NOT A VET

MOONY IS AN AXOLOTL AND IT ALSO SAYS WHAT HE IS AT THE TOP OF THAT POST QUIT ASKIN ME WHAT HE IS

I'm writing a webnovel called Darkeye! Scroll down to the bottom of the sidebar for the link to my website!

 

suupersnek asked
So what's your other favorite game? Since you said Okami was in your top two

image

GHOST TRICK

I LOVE GHOST TRICK

and of course other favorites include The Legend of Zelda and Ace Attorney series, Shadow of the Colossus, Psychonauts, uhhh… there are other games I like out there.

if you’re wondering why these are all games from like 2004 it’s because the nearest thing to a “next gen” console I own is a Nintendo Wii and my computer can barely handle browser games poor bab

jtotheizzoe:

sciencefriday:

Did you know you can tell different species of fireflies apart by their flash patterns?

Science Friday produced a killer video about firefly illumination patters, you should give it a watch below:

jtotheizzoe:

sciencefriday:

Did you know you can tell different species of fireflies apart by their flash patterns?

Science Friday produced a killer video about firefly illumination patters, you should give it a watch below:

suupersnek asked
Omg I almost got Okami the other day but I didn't think it looked good enough, is it really that good?

IT’S SO GOOD but I am also biased b/c it is in my top two favorite games of all time. Of course it ain’t perfect, but all of its flaws are so minor when compared to the whole deal.

People say that if you like Zelda you’ll like this game, and that’s absolutely true. It’s pretty shamelessly pulling out of the Zelda bag. But what elevates it above Zelda (and don’t get me wrong, I really am a big Zelda fan) at least in my eyes is the sheer attention to detail.

I have played this massive game many, many times and I am still discovering little easter eggs. Little tricks put in simply for humor or for a tug at the heartstrings. (Did you know if you headbutt monkeys, they throw poop at you? Or that using blizzard on people turns them into snowmen? Did you know if you power slash the scroll in Princess Fuse’s house, it rolls up and reveals a picture of her dead husband?)

Every character design is unique, for all the characters that appear in this game- even the most unimportant NPCs have little jokes worked into their design. (One of my favorites is the tea shop owner with a head that looks like the steamed buns he sells.) The dialogue is lovely and full of character; the translators did a wonderful job.

The reason I can keep coming back to this game is because literally, it is just a joy to run around in. Everything that is satisfying about solving puzzles in Zelda is 100 times more satisfying here because the game really makes you feel good about what you do. YOU’RE MAKIN THE DANG FLOWERS COME BACK. GOOD DOG.

…I could go on, but yes, Okami is worth it. SO WORTH IT. HNNNGH.

(Oh, and for the other person who asked, I own both the Wii and PS2 versions but I prefer the PS2 version. The Wii one is a decent port but far from perfect. Haven’t played Okami HD on the PS3, though.)

there’s always that one game you can pick up and play no matter how many times you’ve beaten it and for me that game is Okami

MY LOYAL LOYAL ANIMORPHS LIVE TWEET FOLLOWERS!!!

friendsihadwheniwas12:

GOOD EVENING TO YOU ALL.

So my good friend koryos and I are going to podcast about our mutual Animorphs experiences—theirs as a long-time fan and mine from this summer. WHAT I NEED FROM YOU ALL is any suggestions for topics and questions you’d like me or them to address. I’m personally really curious to see if there’s anything you’re looking to ask newcomers like me, as it’ll help me organize my thoughts.

Comment if you can, or shoot questions at me on twitter if you’re there!

THANKS!!!

PODCAST FORTHCOMING! Topics you’d like us to address? Books that need some attention? QUOTES YOU’D LIKE US TO READ? Go go!

rhamphotheca:

Siphonophores are colonial gelatinous animals related to corals, hydroids, and true jellyfish. This deep-sea species, Erenna richardi, was observed at 1560 meters depth using ROV Doc Ricketts. 
A different species of Erenna was discovered by MBARI scientists to attract prey using red bioluminescent lures:  read more here
(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

rhamphotheca:

Siphonophores are colonial gelatinous animals related to corals, hydroids, and true jellyfish. This deep-sea species, Erenna richardi, was observed at 1560 meters depth using ROV Doc Ricketts.

A different species of Erenna was discovered by MBARI scientists to attract prey using red bioluminescent lures:  read more here

(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

libutron:

Lined Supple Skink  (Lined Writhing Skink)
The Lined Supple Skink, Lygosoma lineata (Scincidae) is a species endemic to India, widespread in the Western Ghats, but is not common anywhere within its range.
This skink has an elongate and slender body (up to 6cm long), short and weak limbs, each one with four digits only; and five or six distinctive brownish-golden lines on its body.
Lygosoma lineata is a diurnal skink, mostly seen under large boulders, loose soil associated with termite mounds and ant hills in open scrublands.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Vishal Prasad
Locality: unknown

libutron:

Lined Supple Skink  (Lined Writhing Skink)

The Lined Supple Skink, Lygosoma lineata (Scincidae) is a species endemic to India, widespread in the Western Ghats, but is not common anywhere within its range.

This skink has an elongate and slender body (up to 6cm long), short and weak limbs, each one with four digits only; and five or six distinctive brownish-golden lines on its body.

Lygosoma lineata is a diurnal skink, mostly seen under large boulders, loose soil associated with termite mounds and ant hills in open scrublands.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Vishal Prasad

Locality: unknown

Anonymous asked
Hello, I have an old house, and sometimes a bat (i think it's a brown bat, they're pretty common around here) will find its way down the chimney and end up trapped in one of the other rooms. What's the best way to get it back outside? Should I catch and release? Or just open a window and shoo it out? And would it be better to do at night? Any tips would be helpful :x Thank you!

My advice to you would be to call a professional in to humanely remove the bat for you- they can handle it safely and check to see if there is a roost up in your chimney. What you think is one bat might be several.

If it is a colony in your chimney, it’s summer and that means that there are probably mothers with babies that can’t fly yet. (In fact, there’s a real possibility that your confused brown bat is just a baby that has no idea what’s happening.) You might want to just shut the damper or secure the bottom of the chimney and wait for fall before getting them removed; that way you can ensure the babies will be all right.

If the bat is stuck in your house and flapping around in a panic, there are several steps you can take.

  1. Close off the room that the bat is in (towels under doors and everything). Put on gloves- leather or gardening gloves work fine- and long pants to reduce the risk of getting bitten.
  2. If the room has a window, open it, and see if the bat flies out naturally.
  3. If the bat doesn’t fly out, you can attempt to capture it using a small box or container after it lands. BE CAREFUL: bat wings are very delicate.
  4. Bats can’t take off well from the ground, so your best chances of catching it are when it is on the floor. Likewise, when releasing it, try to get it onto a tree or other vertical surface.

This video from Bat Conservation International might be helpful.

The thing is, your troubles aren’t going to be over once the bat is outside. That bat is going to go straight back to its roost in your chimney until you block it from coming back in. Which is why, again, I recommend calling a professional.

A warning: You should never ever ever attempt to pick up a wild bat with your bare hands. While people have a grossly exaggerated idea of how frequently they carry rabies (only about 0.5% of bats actually have it) it is nevertheless a virus you do NOT want to get. If a bat is being “docile” or having difficulty flying, that may be a symptom of the virus.

You can’t get rabies from bat poo, but there is a chance you could get a Histoplasmis fungal infection from poop that’s been left in damp conditions for a while. So be careful when cleaning up bat guano.

Ok, I think that’s about it. Good luck with your bat(s)!

realmonstrosities:

Here’s a sweet little siphonophore bobbing around in the deep sea!

Siphonophores are members of the phylum Cnidaria, like jellyfish, sea anemones and corals.

They’re colonial animals. What you see here is not one, single individual, but an entire army of sea anemones and jellyfish all stuck together.

The sea anemones (or polyps) are at the bottom and use their stinging tentacles to catch food.

The jellyfish (or medusae) are at the top, where they pulse and beat away so that the whole gang can get around.

The Golden Horde is back! And this time they’re kinda cute.

…Video: Inner Space Centre

I’m working on my “Advantages of Asexual Behavior” post right now and I mean to talk about it mostly in vertebrates since that’s what people have such a hard time believing but I’m getting so sidetracked on a tangent about how weird and unusual sexual behavior even is and how we’re all literally big colonies of cell clones and why it was a stupid idea to make specialized cell types and how actually unsuccessful multicellular organisms are in the long run.

At some point I’ll talk about African wild dogs and naked mole rats and komodo dragons but right now I’m all like cells??? SEX????

sinobug:

"We Have Lift-off!" 
Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

"We Have Lift-off!"

Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..