I have a website!

Call me Koryos. I study biology and psychology and I write novels. Right now my goals are to a) go to grad school and b) get published.

My blog is like 85% animal science and 15% video games with a smattering of kvetchy text posts so I hope you're ok with that. And I also like... write fiction... occasionally.

I KNOW I WROTE THAT CAT POST BUT I CAN'T DIAGNOSE YOUR CAT'S BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS PLEASE TALK TO A VET I AM NOT A VET

MOONY IS AN AXOLOTL AND IT ALSO SAYS WHAT HE IS AT THE TOP OF THAT POST QUIT ASKIN ME WHAT HE IS

I'm writing a webnovel called Darkeye! Scroll down to the bottom of the sidebar for the link to my website!

 

realmonstrosities:

Heaven has chubby, rosy-cheeked cherubs fluttering through blue, cloudless skies on improbably tiny wings.

Hell has Armoured Searobins crawling on mud and rock with their four, spindly fin spines.

These fish get their name from the bony scutes that cover their body. They live fairly deep in the sea, and find prey by scouring the ocean floor with their elaborate barbels.

Fishermen sometimes catch them, and then have absolutely no idea what on earth they’re looking at.

You can’t blame them. No-one really knows what a demon looks like.

Images: NOAA/何宣慶/D Ross Robertson

bogleech:

endangereduglythings:

Baby gharials are adorable. I hope they make the same “mep!” that baby caimans make.

I know crocodilians don’t even open their mouths to make noise but imagine all these little stick faces yapping away

bogleech:

endangereduglythings:

Baby gharials are adorable. I hope they make the same “mep!” that baby caimans make.

I know crocodilians don’t even open their mouths to make noise but imagine all these little stick faces yapping away

(Source: seal-team-seven)

libutron:

wakatobidiveresort:

Cheeky Beach is a shrimp breeding ground, home to a number of rare and colorful species: harlequin seen here, Coleman and menacing mantis shrimp, along with frogfish and pygmy seahorses. (Photograph: David Gray)

Harlequin shrimp (Hymenocera picta)

libutron:

wakatobidiveresort:

Cheeky Beach is a shrimp breeding ground, home to a number of rare and colorful species: harlequin seen here, Coleman and menacing mantis shrimp, along with frogfish and pygmy seahorses. (Photograph: David Gray)

Harlequin shrimp (Hymenocera picta)

Dominance Behavior in Canids

I didn’t really even WANT to make a post about this.

The alpha-beta-omega model of wolf packs is dead in scientific literature, hammered into the ground, so to speak, and it’s been dead for over ten years. So why am I still hearing about it on TV and reading about it in articles? Why are popular dog trainers that encourage you to “be the alpha” still taken seriously?

I think the unfortunate truth is that the idea that there are strong and ferocious leaders in wolf packs and that you, too, can take on that role with your dog is just somehow appealing to people. Almost romantic, in the older sense of the word. And because of this, it makes money. It sells werewolf media. It sells dog training classes. Educational science channels that have no business promoting this false ideology keep it on board because it gets people watching.

If you couldn’t tell, I’m pretty fed up with the whole thing.

Okay, let’s talk about dominance, particularly what the word even means, because popular media does a terrible job of explaining it.

Read more…

Anonymous asked
Hierarchy in wild wolf packs (alphas, betas, etc.) are a myth, right?

You’re not the first person to ask me this but you ARE the person I’m finally gonna respond to. In 3000 words.

sillymelonhead asked
Do you have a favorite game developer? Either an individual or a company?

Hmm… well, I do really like the works of Fumito Ueda and Shu Takumi, though neither of them have done TERRIBLY much. (I’m still waiting for The Last Guardian, damnit!)

I also like Shu Takumi just as a human being because look. Look at him and his pomeranian.

He made that same pomeranian a major protagonist in one of his games and you can’t not love a man who does that.

bookkeeperamanda asked
Hi! I saw your post about making your cat a treat puzzle out of a cereal box, and was wondering what sorts of "enrichment" activities have you made for her that have kept her busy and happy? Mine has just hit that why-can't-I-eat-a-whole-pizza-and-not-gain-weight-anymore point in his life, and while he does have other animals in the house to play with, there's still a lot of laying around that (probably) happens when I'm at work; plus, he seems to deal with boredom the same way as I do: eating

If you can try to play with your cat for about 10 minutes a day that’s honestly going to be the best form of exercise, plus it has social interaction with you mixed in. All other forms of self-motivated exercise are going to depend on your cat’s… well, motivation.

That said, there are a lot of “slow-feeder” type toys available on the market- here’s a list of a few. Here’s another list of feeders you can make yourself.

Whether or not your cat takes to them kind of depends on the cat. My cat is the type to quickly get bored or frustrated, so I try to combat that by switching up the types of puzzles I give her and keeping them relatively easy.

contemplatingchicken asked
Hey! Your blog is awesome. I was wondering if you'd ever come across anything about the deer around Todaiji temple in Nara, Japan -- they are super tame, kind of small, and have been coexisting with humans there for quite a while, so I was wondering if anyone has studied whether that group has begun to diverge from the general deer population in Japan.

Hmm, I know there’s been research done on that particular group of deer- they’re a species called sika deer (Cervus nippon), incidentally- but I don’t know if anyone has been studying the divergence of the Nara population from the rest of the population.

Sika deer are actually further split into twelve different subspecies spread across East Asia. I believe the subspecies found in Nara Park is C. n. nippon, which is found across most of Japan. The small size is normal even for deer in non-urban areas.

There are a few papers out there that look promising, but they’re either ancient and/or I can’t gain access to them. I bet that there’s a greater wealth of information in the Japanese-only scientific literature.

I would say that there certainly seems to be a sort of island/self-domestication effect on the Nara population; I’m surprised I can’t actually dig up more research on it.

(I pity the people who sit in the park all day selling the deer crackers.)

Further reading? (If you have access to this, tell me what it says.)

Torii, H., & Tatsuzawa, S. (2009). Sika deer in Nara Park: unique human-wildlife relations. In Sika Deer (pp. 347-363). Springer Japan.

butterflycoffin asked
I saw your list of favourite games and a lot of them are also mine! I think you should consider playing Resident Evil 4 (for the Wii) and the Persona 3/4 games since I love those ones a lot too /o/

Ahh, I started playing RE4 a long time ago and then got too scared to finish it. I am WEAK. I DON’T LIKE CHAINSAWS COMING AT ME. I know it’s a good game though as I’ve watched roommates playing through it.

…I was about to say I can’t handle zombies, but I DID somehow get through Amnesia and A Machine For Pigs, so. I mean I guess those weren’t zombies? IDK. I have footage of myself playing Amnesia and nearly crying somewhere.

I’ve wanted to play some of the Persona series for a while now because it’s so popular, but I have to admit I have some trepidation because I usually don’t enjoy JRPGs. But I hear it’s more of a visual novel type? I dunno. I just need to get my hands on a copy at some point.

Anonymous asked
Have you ever played 999? It's a DS game that's been out for a while now so you can probably get it for cheap used and I feel like you would really like it...

I started playing 999 a while ago and I should PROBABLY finish it. I just remember not liking the style of writing, and since it was such a text-heavy game, I got irritated enough where I stopped playing. (I’m very picky about writing, eheh.)

I think I will pick it up again at some point since a lot of people seem to really enjoy it, though.

wheezingwolf asked
In regards to your heat pits post, it might be worth editing "carpet boa" to carpet python (they are an Australian python) as well as clarifying that boa constrictors (boa the species, not genus) lack heat pits. "Boa" is a fuzzy term in the snake world ^^;

Thanks for the corrections- I’ll do that!