I have a website!

Call me Koryos. I study biology and psychology and I write novels. Right now my goals are to a) go to grad school and b) get published.

My blog is like 85% animal science and 15% video games with a smattering of kvetchy text posts so I hope you're ok with that. And I also like... write fiction... occasionally.

I KNOW I WROTE THAT CAT POST BUT I CAN'T DIAGNOSE YOUR CAT'S BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS PLEASE TALK TO A VET I AM NOT A VET

MOONY IS AN AXOLOTL AND IT ALSO SAYS WHAT HE IS AT THE TOP OF THAT POST QUIT ASKIN ME WHAT HE IS

I'm writing a webnovel called Darkeye! Scroll down to the bottom of the sidebar for the link to my website!

 

libutron:

The Olm - Proteus anguinus 

This strange creature is commonly known as the Olm, a rare cave salamander belonging to the species Proteus anguinus (Caudata - Proteidae), which is only found in Europe. 

The Olm is perfectly adapted to live in caves. As it spends its entire life in darkness, Proteus anguinus has very poorly developed eyes and is blind. It also lacks pigment in the skin, giving its body a pasty white appearance, Its pink hue is due to blood capillaries near the skin, and as its translucency shows the contours of the internal organs. 

This salamander does not undergo a clear metamorphosis and retains many juvenile features, such as gills, throughout its life. It is long-lived, potentially reaching up to 58 years of age.

The Olm is restricted to subterranean aquatic habitats in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, France, Italy and Slovenia. The species is classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Darko Visek | Locality: Rokina, Croatia, 2008] - [Bottom: ©National Geographic | Locality: Divje Jezero, Idrija, Slovenia]

It’s frustrating to see people constantly term animal behaviors as showing “dominance” when the better word might be “confidence.” Dominance is a relationship, not a character trait; not all confident actions imply that a dominance relationship exists (especially when you’re observing two animals that have JUST MET).

Equally frustrating is the constant assertion that each behavior always has ONE meaning, without paying attention to context or anything else. Humans can smile in friendly or seductive or aggressive ways; humans can shake their fists in triumph or rage; humans can run out of fear or excitement. Animal behaviors can also have multiple meanings. Context, people. Context and familiarity with the animal and then knowledge of the behavior.

I know some people wanted hardcover versions of Darkeye but while I might be able to get softcover versions priced like $15/book through POD services the hardcover versions would be like $40 each soOoOoOooo…

(Those are pretty generous estimates, too. Volume 1 might end up exceeding 400 pages by the looks of things.)

realmonstrosities:

Bubble Corals have modified tentacles that get inflated with water so as to provide light for their symbiotic algae.

At night, the bubbles are deflated to make room for other, more ordinary tentacles that capture prey.

They also have another set of even longer tentacles known as sweepers that are used to attack other corals. Those bubbles need their space, after all.

…Images: Nemo’s great uncle/RevolverOcelot/Bernard DUPONT

whatthefauna:

Spotted garden eels live in colonies of up to several thousand individuals. They spend the majority of their lives with only the top half of their body sticking out of a burrow they make in the sand, eating plankton and other tiny animals that float by. If in danger, the entire “garden” retracts into the sand in the blink of an eye.

Images: blueparadiseindonesia, Eric Cheng, Ryan Murphy

rosi3333 asked
Okay. This time I have an actual definite question. You mentioned in a post that the intellidog strain could be passed by dogs basically sniffing each other. At the end it depicts the dogs regurgitating meat for the lions. If they had cubs would it transferred to them as well? Or is it only limited to dogs?

I won’t deny that I did briefly fantasize about Mhumhi and Vimbo meeting a society of talking lions in the desert but no, the virus only affects canids.

zielderhydra asked
darkeye has been so frickin awesome to follow over the past however-many months and basically i am here to tell you that i'm super confused about the fact that updates from a webnovel about dog hell were always bright moments in my day (even though i think i cried about fictional dogs at least once) but i'm also super excited about the future ebook!!!!! many many high fives to you and i look forward to seeing the other stuff you write in the future, i can't WAIT, i will buy all of it

Thank you so much, goshhhh, you all are making me want to start on the next webnovel right away… but no I shall persevere and EDIT for at least like a month.

Thank you. Thank you to everyone!! I’m gettin all goopy over here good lord I gotta go

endangereduglythings:

whatthefauna:

The sawfish uses its long, toothed rostrum not for killing, but for immobilizing. Also known as the carpenter shark, its nose is covered in electrosensitive pores that detect small movements in the water. When it detects food nearby, the shark slashes its nose through the water to stun prey long enough to gobble it up.

Image credit: Elyse Booth

The rostrum is a lot more maneuverable than I thought. Look at it juggle that fish into its mouth.