Call me Koryos. I study biology and psychology and I write novels. Right now my goals are to a) go to grad school and b) get published.

My blog is like 85% animal science and 15% video games with a smattering of kvetchy text posts so I hope you're ok with that. And I also like... write fiction... occasionally.

I KNOW I WROTE THAT CAT POST BUT I CAN'T DIAGNOSE YOUR CAT'S BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS PLEASE TALK TO A VET I AM NOT A VET

MOONY IS AN AXOLOTL AND IT ALSO SAYS WHAT HE IS AT THE TOP OF THAT POST QUIT ASKIN ME WHAT HE IS

I'm writing a web novel called Darkeye! Scroll down to the bottom of the sidebar for the link!

 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Pygmy Falcon (Polihierax semitorquatus)

Also known as the African Pygmy Falcon, P. semitorquatus is a small species of falcon, that occurs in eastern and southern Africa. The population in eastern Africa (P. s. castanotus) occurs from Sudan to Somalia south to Uganda and Tanzania. The population in southern Africa (P. s. semitorquatus) occurs from Angola to South Africa.

True to its common name P. semitorquatus is very small at only 19-20 cm long, making it the smallest raptor in Africa. Pygmy falcons typically inhabit dry bush habitats and will feed on insects, small mammals, birds, and reptiles. Pygmy falcons will usually in the nests of weavers, and even though they feed on bird will rarely go after their weaver neighbors.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Falconiformes-Falconidae-Polihierax-P. semitorquatus

Images: Steve Garvie and Bob

thejunglenook:


So It Turns Out That Monkeys Are Pretty Good At Doing Math
George Dvorsky, io9A recently concluded experiment shows that rhesus monkeys are capable of doing simple addition using numbers 1 through 25. But more interesting than that is the observation that they also make the same mistakes as us.To test whether monkeys can represent and manipulate numbers in their head, neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone of Harvard Medical School and her colleagues set up a rather interesting experiment.Prior to this, however, the monkeys learned to associate the Arabic numbers 0 through 9 and 15 select letters with the values zero through 25. This was done by having the monkeys choose larger numbers as a means to acquire greater quantities of a food reward.But for the new experiment, the monkeys had to work a bit harder for it. They had to perform addition in order to correctly choose the larger reward. Specifically, they were given a choice between performing a sum calculation and a single symbol rather than just two single symbols. Eventually, they learned how add the two symbols and compare the sum to a third, single symbol.To rule out the possibility that they were simply memorizing combinations of symbols, the researchers taught the monkeys an entirely new set of symbols. They were still successful, calculating previously unseen sets of combinations.The monkeys weren’t perfect, however. And in fact, they committed an error often exhibited by humans. Aviva Rutkin from New Scientist explains:
The monkeys made more mistakes on problems involving numbers that were close in value – a fact which might ultimately prove more interesting than their success at small numbers. Neuroscientists already know that the human brain is better at distinguishing between two low numbers than two high ones. For example, you could easily tell the difference between two and four birds sitting in a tree, but you’d be less likely to spot the difference between a flock of 22 and a flock of 24. What we don’t know is why. Some think it is because the brain encodes numbers logarithmically, so that we perceive the distance between two small numbers as greater than that between two large ones. Others argue that the brain encodes numbers linearly, as on a number line, but that our concept of a number becomes less distinct as the value increases.
As Rutkin points out, the monkeys were biased towards a linear scale. More insight is likely to emerge if and when monkeys are asked to perform tasks involving multiplication. (io9.com)

 

Journal Reference:Margaret S. Livingstone, Warren W. Pettine, Krishna Srihasam, Brandon Moore, Istvan A. Morocz, and Daeyeol Lee. Symbol addition by monkeys provides evidence for normalized quantity coding. PNAS 2014 : 1404208111v1-201404208. (x)

thejunglenook:

So It Turns Out That Monkeys Are Pretty Good At Doing Math

George Dvorsky, io9

A recently concluded experiment shows that rhesus monkeys are capable of doing simple addition using numbers 1 through 25. But more interesting than that is the observation that they also make the same mistakes as us.

To test whether monkeys can represent and manipulate numbers in their head, neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone of Harvard Medical School and her colleagues set up a rather interesting experiment.

Prior to this, however, the monkeys learned to associate the Arabic numbers 0 through 9 and 15 select letters with the values zero through 25. This was done by having the monkeys choose larger numbers as a means to acquire greater quantities of a food reward.

But for the new experiment, the monkeys had to work a bit harder for it. They had to perform addition in order to correctly choose the larger reward. Specifically, they were given a choice between performing a sum calculation and a single symbol rather than just two single symbols. Eventually, they learned how add the two symbols and compare the sum to a third, single symbol.

To rule out the possibility that they were simply memorizing combinations of symbols, the researchers taught the monkeys an entirely new set of symbols. They were still successful, calculating previously unseen sets of combinations.

The monkeys weren’t perfect, however. And in fact, they committed an error often exhibited by humans. Aviva Rutkin from New Scientist explains:

The monkeys made more mistakes on problems involving numbers that were close in value – a fact which might ultimately prove more interesting than their success at small numbers.

Neuroscientists already know that the human brain is better at distinguishing between two low numbers than two high ones. For example, you could easily tell the difference between two and four birds sitting in a tree, but you’d be less likely to spot the difference between a flock of 22 and a flock of 24.

What we don’t know is why. Some think it is because the brain encodes numbers logarithmically, so that we perceive the distance between two small numbers as greater than that between two large ones. Others argue that the brain encodes numbers linearly, as on a number line, but that our concept of a number becomes less distinct as the value increases.

As Rutkin points out, the monkeys were biased towards a linear scale. More insight is likely to emerge if and when monkeys are asked to perform tasks involving multiplication. (io9.com)

 

Journal Reference:
Margaret S. Livingstone, Warren W. Pettine, Krishna Srihasam, Brandon Moore, Istvan A. Morocz, and Daeyeol Lee. Symbol addition by monkeys provides evidence for normalized quantity coding. PNAS 2014 : 1404208111v1-201404208. (x)


Spotted Hyena “Chewing Exercise” by girlslens on Flickr.
Okavango Delta, Botswana While mom naps, cub gives his teeth and jaws a workout on overhanging branch.

Spotted Hyena “Chewing Exercise” by girlslens on Flickr.

Okavango Delta, Botswana
While mom naps, cub gives his teeth and jaws a workout on overhanging branch.

cisppl:

i’m so in love with shu takumi’s idea of a self-insert

yes i could put myself in this game but you know what’s better what if i put my dog in the game

brains-and-bodies:

From Go ahead, BUG me


The cuteness factor! The color factor! The spike factor!



This little treehopper nymph is an insect triple threat! hehehe!Hemiptera- Membracidae Parque Chicaque, Colombia Immature stage of a Treehopper. Image: David Guzman via flickrhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/entomopixel/8471582626/

brains-and-bodies:

From Go ahead, BUG me

The cuteness factor! The color factor! The spike factor!
This little treehopper nymph is an insect triple threat! hehehe!

Hemiptera- Membracidae 
Parque Chicaque, Colombia 
Immature stage of a Treehopper. 

Image: David Guzman via flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/entomopixel/8471582626/

Naruhodo is Pheonix’s name in Japanesd??? (It means “oh I see.”)

yeah and Apollo’s Japanese name (Odoroki Housuke) means “surprising law boy” idk if you’ve noticed but the series has a thING FOR PUNS

Oh is he like Pheonix’s grampappy?

A RELATIVE OF SOME SORT APPARENTLY???? but he doesn’t have the Wright Brows which is a real shame. BUT HE DOES HAVE A SWORD. EAT YOUR HEART OUT SIMON BLACKQUILL

the real question is why are his eyebrows so normal-looking

page-of-wands asked
I can't find the new ace attorney game announcement, would you happen to have a link?

HERE IS A LINKY LINK

And here is the Fanmitsu scan with the new protagonist, NARUHODOU RYUUNOSUKE

SWORD-CARRYING LAWYERS