Call me Koryos. I study biology and psychology and I write novels. Right now my goals are to a) go to grad school and b) get published.

My blog is like 85% animal science and 15% video games with a smattering of kvetchy text posts so I hope you're ok with that. And I also like... write fiction... occasionally.

I KNOW I WROTE THAT CAT POST BUT I CAN'T DIAGNOSE YOUR CAT'S BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS PLEASE TALK TO A VET I AM NOT A VET

MOONY IS AN AXOLOTL AND IT ALSO SAYS WHAT HE IS AT THE TOP OF THAT POST QUIT ASKIN ME WHAT HE IS

I'm writing a web novel called Darkeye! Scroll down to the bottom of the sidebar for the link!

 

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Staghorn Hermit Crab" (Manucomplans varians)
…a unique species of Pagurid hermit crab that occurs in the northeastern and southeastern Pacific Ocean, ranging from the Gulf of California to Panama.. Like other hermit crabs M. varians will find and use the shells of snails to house its soft body parts. True to what their common name suggests staghorn hermit crabs are almost always seen with a specific species of coral (Nanaria mirabilis) growing on their back. The corals typically grow quite large and create several striking spirals all while being carried around by M. varians. It is unknown if the coral being present has any negative effects on M. varians and it might even serve as a sort of defense/camouflage as M. varians can retreat into the coral and ‘seal’ itself inside using its claw. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Eucarida-Decapoda-Anomura-Paguroidea-Paguridae-Manucomplans-M. varians
Image: Ryanphotographic

astronomy-to-zoology:

"Staghorn Hermit Crab" (Manucomplans varians)

…a unique species of Pagurid hermit crab that occurs in the northeastern and southeastern Pacific Ocean, ranging from the Gulf of California to Panama.. Like other hermit crabs M. varians will find and use the shells of snails to house its soft body parts. True to what their common name suggests staghorn hermit crabs are almost always seen with a specific species of coral (Nanaria mirabilis) growing on their back. The corals typically grow quite large and create several striking spirals all while being carried around by M. varians. It is unknown if the coral being present has any negative effects on M. varians and it might even serve as a sort of defense/camouflage as M. varians can retreat into the coral and ‘seal’ itself inside using its claw. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Eucarida-Decapoda-Anomura-Paguroidea-Paguridae-Manucomplans-M. varians

Image: Ryanphotographic

ichikun replied to your post: ichikun asked:i’ve had enough of …

Paranoid now your followers are gonna think I was HARRASSING you to find out your name DAMN IT

ATTN: ichi is the goat friend of my heart and was trying to make a joke but i made it a serious. love the ichi. commission the ichi. tell the ichi about your ocs.

ichikun asked
i've had enough of these bitches tryna harrass you about your name why don't you just come out and say it. It's not like your name bein (dolphin noises) is a secret

It’s not exactly a secret but there are a few reasons I’d rather keep my real name on the dl…

  1. this is one of the few spaces i have where i can feel truly gender-neutral and my real name is not neutral
  2. my parents aren’t really cool with my sexuality and i don’t want it expedited in coming back around to them

idk i feel like there’s bound to be a serial killer in there somewhere.

So I might say it at some point (I probably will) but for now I politely decline all requests for me to privately tell you my name.

Alright someone found me out so I guess there’s no point in denying it. My full name is Joffrey Baratheon, the First of His Name, King of the Andals and the First Men, Lord of the Seven Kingdoms, and Protector of the Realm.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Western Pipistrelle (Parastrellus hesperus)
Also known as the “Canyon Bat” the western pipistrelle is a species of vesper bat (Vespertilionidae) that occurs in Mexico and the western United States. Like most bats western pipistrelles are active at night and are insectivorous. During periods of time when the weather gets cold or if food supplies lower P. hesperus is known to enter a period of hibernation, hibernating in caves, mines and rocky crevices.
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Chiroptera-Vespertilionidae-Parastrellus-P. hesperus
Image: NPS

astronomy-to-zoology:

Western Pipistrelle (Parastrellus hesperus)

Also known as the “Canyon Bat” the western pipistrelle is a species of vesper bat (Vespertilionidae) that occurs in Mexico and the western United States. Like most bats western pipistrelles are active at night and are insectivorous. During periods of time when the weather gets cold or if food supplies lower P. hesperus is known to enter a period of hibernation, hibernating in caves, mines and rocky crevices.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Chiroptera-Vespertilionidae-Parastrellus-P. hesperus

Image: NPS

hyenor replied to your post: thejunglenook asked:Answer this w…

is that an alaskan klee kai??

Yes it is, and still a puppy. Adorable/exhausting. I was hoping to hold on to the busy bones till the end of the week but I caved and broke them out on the second day.

thejunglenook asked
Answer this with 10 facts about yourself and send it to your 10 favorite followers

This is THE SECOND time you sent me this, gosh dangit, but I’m still gonna answer it because vanity.

1. I have the same full name as a popular character from a very popular television show here on tumblr so sometimes I’ll see urls like [my name]-isntdeadyet or [my name]-should-fuck-[other character’s name].

I actually made one of my close friends here because she kept posting things like “i’m so glad [my name] is still alive” and “[my name] is a queen and deserves respect” and I was like, you know, I agree with both of those.

2. I’m pet-sitting this little devil right now.

Along with another dog and the most DETERMINED cat I have ever seen put his entire head into my cereal bowl.

3. It was 80 degrees a few days ago and then the day after that it snowed/sleeted. Now the temp has been ranging from the 30s-50s again. I know a lot of you live in much colder climes than me but I’m still sad because I had already started putting my winter clothes away.

4. I guess that last one wasn’t really a fact about myself. I guess this one isn’t either. So.

5. I’m allergic to NSAIDs and they’re literally the only thing anyone ever has on hand when I’m out and have a headache. The smart thing to do would be to carry Tylenol around, of course, but I’m physically incapable of planning ahead. (This fact brought to you because it happened again yesterday.)

6. My gorgeous, infuriatingly generous girlfriend bought me a 55 gallon tank for my birthday and I still haven’t forgiven her (but I put my axolotls into it).

7. I thought I would be easily capable of thinking of more facts about myself but I was terribly wrong.

8. Um, here’s one. When I was a child I was constipated so often that I have the random tile pattern in our upstairs bathroom perfectly memorized. To this day. That’s a fact about myself.

9. This dog has the softest ears known to mankind.

10. I still haven’t started writing tomorrow’s chapter of Darkeye but at least I finished this important post.

markscherz:

tiny-creatures:

frog (1) by pbertner on Flickr.

A Gephyromantis species from the subgenus Laurentomantis. Not sure which - it may be undescribed, but I also think it is a juvenile.

markscherz:

tiny-creatures:

frog (1) by pbertner on Flickr.

A Gephyromantis species from the subgenus Laurentomantis. Not sure which - it may be undescribed, but I also think it is a juvenile.

stuckinabucket:

The tiger keelback (Rhabdophis tigrinus) has been annoying pedants the world over for years by being both venomous and poisonous.  It’s not very big (2-3 feet) and subsists mostly on a diet of amphibians.  It’s not terribly aggressive, strongly preferring to either play dead during low ambient temperatures or run away during higher ambient temperatures.

Above: Part of the “no, seriously, I’m dead” display is flattening out their necks to better show off their orange stripes.  There’s apparently some question as to whether this is an aposematic display, but given the fact that it’s venomous, poisonous, and how many other snakes that do the neck thing as a “fuck ooooooooooff” display, I’d say the answer is probably that yes, it’s an aposematic display.

They take the playing dead thing pretty seriously, too.  I mean, they go limp, which is kind of hilarious in a venomous snake. 

Above: What passed for acceptable science in 1983.

There are rattlesnakes out there shaking their heads at this snake.

Part of the lack of significant aggression is probably due to the fact that it’s a rear-fanged snake, which is an arrangement that’s pretty effective if you’re killing small animals to eat them and less desirable if you’re trying to like, keep something thirty times your size from eating you.  Rear-fanged snakes tend to have to open their mouths a lot wider to get a decent fang-grip on something, and the venom delivery mechanism can be a sad mockery of efficiency by occasionally requiring the snakes to actually chew on something to get it properly envenomed*.

Above: Western Hognose snake, which is venomous but not in a way that humans need to care about, displaying its sad little fangs.

Front-fanged snakes generally have both an easier time getting a good strike in and a much better injection mechanism.

The poisonous part comes in due to these snakes being in the habit of first eating poisonous toads and then taking the toads’ chemical defenses as their own.  Unlike the garter snakes who eat rough-skinned newts and wind up just generally toxic, tiger keelbacks have special glands where they concentrate and store the toads’ poison.  Their nuchal glands are found running down either side of their necks, and woe betide you if you break the skin over them.  (There aren’t actually convenient ways for the snake to discharge the gland without tissue rupture.)  Mothers can and do pass loads of the toxin on to their clutches, assuming they have any to spare, which tides the snakelets over until toad-hatching season brings a ton of snakelet-sized poisonous toads for them to eat.

How confident are these bastards in their nuchal glands saving them?

Above: A snake smacking its neck into something that’s annoying it.

So the answer here is: Extremely confident.

Of course, the functionality of these glands depends on the availability of and their ability to catch the poisonous toads they get their poison from, but the great thing about the toxin is that it’s massively unpleasant (foul-smelling, produces acute burning sensation upon contact with mucous membranes, capable of making you quite sick if you eat it), but it’s probably not going to kill a large animal.  So once you’ve had one run-in with a locked and loaded tiger keelback, you really have no particular desire to bite one again, and seeing those stripes come out is going to bring back some really unpleasant memories no matter how much poison that individual snake might be packing.

*Coral snakes do this, for instance.  If you feel the need to let a coral snake bite you, please do not sit there and let it chew on you just because it is tiny and kind of ridiculous.

[Snake-Humiliation Olympics photo from “Death-Feigning Behavior of the Japanese Colubrid Snake Rhabdophis tigrinus.” Akio Mutoh. Herpetologica, 39:1 (Mar., 1983), pp. 78-80; Neck-butting photo from “Nuchal glands: a novel defensive system in snakes.” Akira Mori. Chemoecology, 22 (2012), pp. 187–198.]

Darkeye Chapter 75

Cracking eggs.

Warnings: Brief animal-on-animal violence.

(Previous chapter - Contents - About)

WOW THIS CHAPTER TOOK A LONG TIME TO WRITE I’m really sorry it’s late guys.

I said I was going to have an announcement about Darkeye as well but it may be premature as of this moment. So just hold that thought for a while.

(I’m making it sound like a bigger deal than it is haha.)